Stratemakerstoren

Stratemakerstoren

On the east side of the Waalkade, a few buildings were broken down in the summer of 1987, which revealed a largely preserved roundel. A roundel is a heavy, half-round tower of defence which used to be a part of the city walls. The roundel on the Waalkade was first mentioned in a document from 1526, and is designated as Stratemakerstoren in a city bill of 1569. Possibly, a municipal road worker lived here in times of peace, which would explain the name of the tower (stratemaker = road worker).
In the excavations during the restoration of the Stratemakerstoren, parts of the oldest brick walls of Nijmegen were uncovered: remains of a city wall and a wall tower, dating from around 1400.
In order to better withstand the cannon, which was developed in the 15th century, the tower was made lower and larger. The space between inner- and outer wall was filled up with sand, and an underground gallery with loopholes for the cannons was constructed. For building material, mainly marlstone and large bricks (so-called Roman bricks) were used.
At the end of the 18th century, the Stratemakerstoren lost its function, and in 1789 municipal carpenter J. ten Boven gained permission to built houses on top of the roundel. To create more space, the tower was made lower and the outer wall was largely demolished. The tower was almost completely hidden from view, but not forgotten. The old corridor was still used as storage room for a long time. After the demolition of the houses in 1987, a lengthy restoration of the roundel took place, which included the reconstruction of the outer wall. In 1995, Museum De Stratemakerstoren was opened in the tower.

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